Children and autism

  • Edison Ikonomi Sport Department, Science Movement Faculty, Sport University Tirana
  • Florian Mema Sport Department, Science Movement Faculty, Sport University Tirana

Abstract

Introduction. The development of children with autism involves the sphere
of their activities and interests. They often have a limited range of activities
and interests, express repeated behavior as well as various counteractions in
the premises and everyday surroundings. Children with autism do not play the
same way children with development normal. Their play lack imagination, they
play by reproducing what they have seen or what they remember and do not
add to their play parts from themselves, from their feelings and interpretation.
Many children with autism express preferences for a definite object, a toy, a
color, a certain shape, etc. Methodology The qualitative method was used in
the study. Semi-structured interview with open-ended questions was the instrument
for data collection. Data collections were made possible by interviewing
of parents (10 parents) of children with ASD who were outpatients and inpatients
at Centre Regional for Growth, Development and Rehabilitation Berat
city. Results. Through data analyses it came out that: -- Children with autism
are limited in their activities, they play by copying and without imagination,
show strong memory for what they want and express interest for certain definite
objects, for toys musical, television, etc. -- Children with autism are not
focused in their daily activities and show behavior and actions that are stereotype
and repetitive as for movement frequent of the hands, rotation of objects,
etc. Conclusion. The development of children with autism involves the sphere
of their activities and interests by limiting them.

References

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Published
2019-05-02