Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Plants Determination using New Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry Methods

  • Lucian Copolovici Deputy Director of RDI Institute in Natural and Technical Sciences of “Aurel Vlaicu” University
  • Astrid Kännaste Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 1 Kreutzwaldi, 51014, Tartu
  • Andreea Pag Institute of Research, Development, Innovation in Technical and Natural Sciences of “Aurel Vlaicu” University, 2 Elena Dragoi St., 310330, Arad
  • Daniel Tomescu Institute of Research, Development, Innovation in Technical and Natural Sciences of “Aurel Vlaicu” University, 2 Elena Dragoi St., 310330, Arad
  • Adina Bodescu Faculty of Food Engineering, Tourism and Environmental Protectio and Institute of Research, Development, Innovation in Technical and Natural Sciences of “Aurel Vlaicu” University, 2 Elena Dragoi St., 310330, Arad
  • Ülo Niinemets Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 1 Kreutzwaldi, 51014, Tartu

Abstract

In the nature, plants emit numerous volatile organic compounds. Common plant volatiles include various green leaves volatiles, terpenes, phenylpropanoids and/or benzenoids. In the present paper it will be characterized thermal desorption (TD) and solid phase microextraction methods (SPME) for simultaneous determination of green leaves volatiles (GLVs), various mono- and sesquiterpenes in headspace of plants. The first method is based on preconcentration of VOCs on solid absorbents coupled with the gas chromatograpy mass-spectrometry coupled with thermal desorption system (GCMS-TD). For trapping the volatile organic compounds (VOC) we used a multibead tube filled with solid sorbents (Carbotrap c and Carbopack c). Different types of solid sorbents have been tested and characterised. The second method is based on adsorption of different volatile compounds on the fibres followed by GC-MS analyses. The fibres trapped and released volatile organic compounds with different numbers of carbons atoms. Both methods have been used for volatile organic compounds emitted by plants from Betulaceae family.

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Published
2015-06-17